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What Do I Do If My Pet Gets Poisoned?

What Do I Do If My Pet Gets Poisoned?

How To Be Prepared In The Event Your Pet Gets Poisoned

I know this isn’t a fun topic to talk about. But it’s something that NEEDS to be discussed. With March being Pet Poison Prevention Awareness Month, we felt there was no better time to talk about this subject. There are a number of deadly poisons for both dogs and cats that are important to be aware of. Today we’re going to describe exactly what those poisons are, how to identify the symptoms of poisoning, and what to do in the event your pet becomes poisoned.

Types Of Dog And Cat Poisons

The Pet Poison Helpline is a great resource when learning about pet poisons. They even have a list of the top most dangerous and common poisons for both dogs and cats, which we will share a few with you here:

Dogs

  1. Chocolate
  2. Mouse/Rat Poisons
  3. Vitamins/Minerals
  4. Essentially all types of medications including cold/allergy medications, antidepressants, cardiac medications, etc.

Cats

  1. Insecticides
  2. Household cleaners
  3. Lilies
  4. Most types of medications including cold/flu medications, antidepressants, ADD/ADHD medications, etc.
  5. Glow sticks
  6. Mouse/Rat Poisons

As you can see, a lot of these poisonous items may not be so obvious to the average pet owner. This is why it’s so important to be educated on what can be potentially harmful to your pet. That way you won’t make the mistake of accidentally leaving your medication on the counter or your chocolate bar.

How Do I Know If My Pet Is Poisoned?

Depending on the type of poison your pet has ingested, they may exhibit a variety of symptoms. However, most of these symptoms will fall into one or more of these four categories:

  • Gastrointestinal: Vomiting, diarrhea, drooling/hyper-salivating, lack of appetite, and nausea.
  • Internal Bleeding: Coughing/Vomiting blood, pale gums, racing heart rate, weakness, lethargy, and collapsing,
  • Kidney Failure: Lack of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst or urination, or absence of urination.
  • Liver Failure: Gum discoloration, weakness or collapsing due to low blood sugar, vomiting, diarrhea, black stool.

Any of these symptoms could potentially mean your pet is poisoned. It’s important to keep an eye on your pet and immediately take action if any of these symptoms arise. While there are a number of resources you can take advantage of if your pet is poisoned, it’s important to focus on preventing poisoning. This could mean taking special care not to leave potentially harmful items out where your pet can reach them. Or, maybe this means restricting your pet to one area of the house. There are also a number of obedience classes that can help your dog learn what is “okay” and “not okay” to eat.

I Think My Pet Is Poisoned – What Now?

There is a multitude of resources available in the event your pet is poisoned. The first step is to identify what your pet has ingested and to note what their symptoms are.

From there, you’ll want to immediately call your veterinarian if it’s a time of day you’re able to get ahold of them. If not, take advantage of the Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680 or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.

The ASPCA also offers an Animal Poison Control Center App that will help you identify what foods or substances may be potentially poisonous to pets and the level of toxicity.

While there are a number of resources you can take advantage of if your pet is poisoned, it’s important to focus on preventing poisoning. This could mean taking special care not to leave potentially harmful items out where your pet can reach them.

Or, maybe this means restricting your pet to one area of the house. There are also a number of obedience classes that can help your dog learn what is “okay” and “not okay” to eat. To learn more about pet poison prevention, make sure you talk to your veterinarian to gain more valuable knowledge and resources.

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